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  • Dr. Jessica Hekman

    • Wednesday, May 20, 2015
    • 7:00 PM (CDT)
    • Monday, May 20, 2019
    • 8:00 PM (CDT)
    • Recorded Webinar
    Register

    presented by Dr. Jessica Hekman

    CEUs: IAABC 1, CPDT 1, KPA 1, PPAB 1



    Why haven't we found a genetic test yet that will predict aggression in dogs? In this presentation Dr. Jessica will  summarize then current approaches that have been taken to answering this problem and explain the pitfalls that researchers have encountered. Dr.  Jessica will  describe some specific findings in dogs and humans and put them in context to explain their relevance to our understanding of canine aggression in the real world. The webinar will also discuss the  future directions of research in this area and give some hope for future results.

    Webinar Objectives

    • List some approaches to finding a genetic test for aggression
    • Explain why finding a genetic test for aggression is difficult and unlikely to happen soon
    • Describe some specific mechanisms for the interaction of genetics and environment to influence aggression in dogs

    About The Presenter


    Jessica is a veterinarian currently pursuing a PhD in genetics. After eleven years working as a computer programmer, she decided to go back to school to research the causes of behavior problems in dogs. She received her veterinary degree from the Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine in Massachusetts, where she also received a Master's degree for her work on stress behaviors in hospitalized dogs. After graduation, she completed a year-long internship specializing in shelter medicine at the University of Florida Maddie's Shelter Medicine Program. She is now enrolled in a PhD program in genetics at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Her lab studies a group of foxes (often known as the "Siberian silver foxes") which have been bred over many generations to be friendly to humans. Her ultimate goal is to find genetic causes of fearfulness in dogs, to work with behaviorally challenged shelter dogs, and to help people better understand the science behind dog behavior.

    Jessica is a New Englander at heart, but currently lives in Urbana, Illinois with her husband and two dogs (an elderly golden retriever and a fearful collie-retriever mix). You can learn more about her at www.dogzombie.com.

    • Wednesday, October 28, 2015
    • 8:00 PM (EDT)
    • Monday, October 28, 2019
    • 9:00 PM (EDT)
    • Recorded Webinar
    Register

    presented by Dr. Jessica Hekman

    CEUs: PPAB 1, IAABC 1, CPDT 1, KPA 1 



    We've known for years how important it is to socialize puppies (and, in fact, animals of all mammalian species) at a young age in order to prevent behavior problems such as fearfulness and aggression from cropping up later. In this webinar, we will learn about how the canine socialization period was discovered, and we'll review the current state of knowledge about its timing. In the meat of the talk, we'll discuss some recent research findings about exactly what is going on in the brain which is different in puppies in their socialization window compared to older dogs outside the socialization window. We'll talk about differences in the puppy stress response and where those differences originate; we'll also talk about studies that have used a critical period of eye development to learn about neural wiring differences in the socialization period, and what implications those have for puppies. Finally, we will discuss appropriate ways of balancing a puppy's need for socialization with the dangers of exposing a puppy to other dogs before its immune system is mature.


    Webinar Objectives

    • Describe the timing of the canine socialization window and the methods used to discover it
    • Describe two mechanisms which are known to function differently in the mammalian brain during the socialization period
    • Suggest approaches to satisfying a puppy's need for socialization with the dangers of exposing a puppy to other dogs prior to the end of its puppy vaccine series


    About The Presenter


    Jessica Perry Hekman, DVM, MS is fascinated by dog brains. She is a PhD student at the University of Illinois, training in a genomics lab which studies a population of tame foxes. Her interests include the stress response in mammals, canine behavior, shelter medicine, and animal welfare. You may learn more about Jessica at www.dogzombie.com.
    • Wednesday, March 23, 2016
    • 8:00 PM (EDT)
    • Saturday, March 23, 2019
    • 9:00 PM (EDT)
    • Recorded Webinar
    Register

    Presented by Dr Jessica Hekman

    CEUs: PPAB 1, IAABC 1, CPDT 1, KPA 1



    Why do puppies need to have such a long series of vaccines? Owners have difficulty understanding the ins and outs of the puppy (and kitten) vaccine series, and may ask you to explain exactly WHY they can't consider their new pet fully immunized after the first set of shots. Does this have to do with the number of shots or with the timing of the shots? What is so special about 16-18 weeks of age that animals can now start going out in public more?

    In this webinar, Dr. Jessica Hekman will explain the biology behind the developing immune system and the reason for the complex timing of puppy vaccines. Beginning with the basics of how the mammalian immune system works and how vaccines provide protection from infectious disease, she will explain how the immature immune system differs biologically from the adult immune system. She will describe the reasoning behind giving puppies a series of shots, so that you can better explain the process to owners. She will conclude with a few practical suggestions for balancing the need to socialize young animals with the need to protect them from infectious disease.


    Webinar Objectives

    • summarize how vaccines provide protection from infectious disease
    • explain how the immature (puppy/kitten) immune system differs biologically from the adult immune system
    • explain why puppy shots are not effective long term when given before 16-18 weeks of age
    • explain why we give puppies repeated vaccinations between the ages of 6-18 weeks even though we do not expect these vaccinations to be effective long term
    • describe a practical approach to balancing the conflicting needs of socialization and reduced exposure to infectious disease during ages 6-18 weeks


    About The Presenter



    Jessica is a veterinarian currently pursuing a PhD in genetics. After eleven years working as a computer programmer, she decided to go back to school to research the causes of behavior problems in dogs. She received her veterinary degree from the Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine in Massachusetts, where she also received a Master's degree for her work on stress behaviors in hospitalized dogs. After graduation, she completed a year-long internship specializing in shelter medicine at the University of Florida Maddie's Shelter Medicine Program. She is now enrolled in a PhD program in genetics at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Her lab studies a group of foxes (often known as the "Siberian silver foxes") which have been bred over many generations to be friendly to humans. Her ultimate goal is to find genetic causes of fearfulness in dogs, to work with behaviorally challenged shelter dogs, and to help people better understand the science behind dog behavior.

    Jessica lives in Urbana, Illinois with her husband and two dogs. You can follow her on Twitter @dogzombieblog or read her blog at http://dogzombie.blogspot.com.




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