Log in


  • Home
  • Live Webinars

Live Webinars

To learn more about Go To Webinar, the platform we use for live webinars you can click here to watch a short tutorial

    • Friday, March 29, 2019
    • 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM (EDT)
    • Live Webinar
    Register

    CEUs: PPAB 1.5, CCPDT 1.5

    Registered for the live event, get busy and cannot make it?

    Don't worry, you will automatically receive a recording!

    Most of us are familiar with behavior chains - behaviors are linked together and performed one after another.  The metaphor of a chain is easy to visualize, but the problem with the image is it tends to be linear.  That may be how the final sequence of behaviors are performed, but it is not the best way to teach them.  Training in loops is a much more effective image.  In this program we’ll explore what that means.

    Learning Objectives

    We will:
    • Define Loopy Training
    • Look at example/non-example
    • Define movement cycles and their connection to Loopy Training
    • Revisit the Poisoned Cue research - what does it tell us about Loopy Training?
    • Design well constructed loops that include emotional balance
    • Apply the Loopy Training mantra to training: Getting Started
    • Develop larger patterns out of simple loops 
    • Avoid extinction by priming the Loopy Training pump 
    • Define Extinction and look at the emotional fallout 
    • Explore the roles micro extinction and resurgence play in shaping


    About The Presenter



    Alexandra Kurland is a graduate of Cornell University where she specialized in animal behavior. She began teaching horse training in the early 1980's. Her area of particular interest is the development of a horse's balance: physical and emotional. Helping horses stay sound and happy throughout a long lifetime is the goal. The result are beautiful horses that feel like heaven to ride.

    In 1998 Alexandra launched the rapidly growing field of clicker training for horses with the publication of her  book, "Clicker Training for Your Horse".

    Alexandra's work helps you apply clicker training to any equine need or sport - including developing a gentle and companionable riding horse, halter training foals, training advanced performance horses, and retraining difficult to manage horses. Her own riding interests align most closely with classical dressage.

    Alexandra travels widely, giving clicker training seminars and presenting at conferences in the US, Canada, the UK and Europe. 

    In addition to "Clicker Training for your Horse", she has written "The Click That Teaches: A Step–By–Step Guide in Pictures" and "The Click That Teaches: Riding with the Clicker". She has also produced The Click That Teaches DVD lesson series, and The Clicker Center On-line Training Course.  She maintains a very active blog, theclickercenterblog.com.  She has published a book: "JOYFULL Horses" in her blog and most recently "The Goat Diaries".  Her current project is Equiosity, a weekly podcast which she produces with Dominique Day, one of the co-founders of Cavalia.

    Alexandra Kurland's websites are:
    theclickercenter.com,
    theclickercenterblog.com,
    theclickercentercourse.com and
    equiosity.com
    • Friday, April 12, 2019
    • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM (EDT)
    • Live Webinar
    Register

    CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT 1

    Registered for the live event, get busy and cannot make it?

    Don't worry, you will automatically receive a recording!

    Modern vaccine technology has permitted us to protect companion animals effectively against serious infectious diseases. However, the challenge to produce effective and safe vaccines for the prevalent infectious diseases of animals has become increasingly difficult. In veterinary medicine, evidence implicating vaccines in triggering immune-mediated and other chronic disorders (vaccinosis) is compelling.  While some of these problems have been traced to contaminated or poorly attenuated batches of vaccine that revert to virulence, others apparently reflect the host’s genetic predisposition to react adversely upon receiving the single (monovalent) or multiple antigen “combo” (polyvalent) products given routinely to animals. Animals of certain susceptible breeds or families appear to be at increased risk for severe and lingering adverse reactions to vaccines. 

    Also see www.rabieschallengefund.org, the parallel clinical research studies to determine that rabies vaccines last for at least 5 years and perhaps longer. The studies are now in year 7 and a summary of the results of the 5-year study can be found on the website.

    Despite this cumulative knowledge, even today, estimates are that only about 40% of veterinarians are following the current WSAVA, AVMA, AAHA and BVA vaccine policy guidelines.   There is no such thing as an ‘up to date’ or ‘due’ vaccination. Enlightened veterinarians can now offer a package of separated vaccine components, when available, rather than give them all together, since the published data show more adverse reactions when multiple vaccines are administered at the same time.

    Learning Objectives:

    10 TOP FACTS on VACCINES

    1. “Core” vaccines important for puppies and kittens
    2. Other vaccines optional depending on location and lifestyle
    3. Annual boosters not required and usually unnecessary/unwise
    4. Vaccination may not equate to immunization; check serum titers to validate
    5. Long-term protection from canine distemper, hepatitis, parvovirus; feline panleukopenia
    6. Measure serum antibody (vaccine titers) instead annually or triennally
    7. Give thimerosal (mercury)-free rabies vaccines; and as late as allowed (20-24 weeks)
    8. Booster vaccinations only legally required for rabies
    9. Half-dose “core” vaccines sufficient to protect small toy dogs
    10. Recognize vaccine adverse events; genetic predisposition. Don’t breed; avoid re-vaccination

    About The Presenter



    Dr. W. Jean Dodds, DVM has spent 5 decades as a clinical research veterinarian.  From 1965-1986, she was a member of many national and international committees on hematology, animal models of human disease, veterinary medicine, and laboratory animal science.  Dr. Dodds was a grantee of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NIH) and has over 150 research publications. 

    She started Hemopet in 1986, the first non-profit national animal blood bank.  Today, Hemopet offers a wide range of nonprofit services and educational activities. She is also Co-Trustee of the Rabies Challenge Fund, a non-profit project to assess the duration of immunity and safety of current rabies vaccines for animals.

    She actively participates in the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association (AHVMA) and the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Foundation. She has written 2 popular award-winning pet health books together with Diana Laverdure; and holds 25 patents.



    • Thursday, April 18, 2019
    • 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM (EDT)
    • Live Webinar
    Register

    CEUs: PPAB 1.5, CCPDT 1.5

    Registered for the live event, get busy and cannot make it?

    Don't worry, you will automatically receive a recording!


    None of us attend conferences, listen to webinars, read training articles, participate in forum discussions to become mediocre trainers.  We do all of this because we care deeply about the animals we work with and we are fascinated by training and the science behind it.  

    So where does excellence come from?  Are there truly "horse whisperers" who were born with the gift, or is excellence something that can be developed?  That’s what this program explores.  

    We’ll also be looking at techniques that improve both your visual and your kinesthetic observational skills.  

    Main Topics covered:

    * What does excellence look like?

    * Why does it matter?

    * How do we achieve excellence?


    Learning Objectives

    • Learning to see detail
    • Where does talent come from 
    • Carol Dweck - Fixed versus growth mindsets
    • Neuroplasticity
    • Awareness Through Movement - The Feldenkrais Method
    • Twelve key skills that will help unlock your observation skills


    About The Presenter



    Alexandra Kurland is a graduate of Cornell University where she specialized in animal behavior. She began teaching horse training in the early 1980's. Her area of particular interest is the development of a horse's balance: physical and emotional. Helping horses stay sound and happy throughout a long lifetime is the goal. The result are beautiful horses that feel like heaven to ride.

    In 1998 Alexandra launched the rapidly growing field of clicker training for horses with the publication of her  book, "Clicker Training for Your Horse".

    Alexandra's work helps you apply clicker training to any equine need or sport - including developing a gentle and companionable riding horse, halter training foals, training advanced performance horses, and retraining difficult to manage horses. Her own riding interests align most closely with classical dressage.

    Alexandra travels widely, giving clicker training seminars and presenting at conferences in the US, Canada, the UK and Europe. 

    In addition to "Clicker Training for your Horse", she has written "The Click That Teaches: A Step–By–Step Guide in Pictures" and "The Click That Teaches: Riding with the Clicker". She has also produced The Click That Teaches DVD lesson series, and The Clicker Center On-line Training Course.  She maintains a very active blog, theclickercenterblog.com.  She has published a book: "JOYFULL Horses" in her blog and most recently "The Goat Diaries".  Her current project is Equiosity, a weekly podcast which she produces with Dominique Day, one of the co-founders of Cavalia.

    Alexandra Kurland's websites are:
    theclickercenter.com,
    theclickercenterblog.com,
    theclickercentercourse.com and
    equiosity.com
    • Friday, May 10, 2019
    • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM (EDT)
    • Live Webinar
    Register


    CEUs: PPAB 1



    Free-ranging dogs are one of the most widely distributed carnivores in the world, yet scientists are only just beginning to study their behavior. They represent a critical field of observation where human-dog interaction can reveal essential understanding about society, human and dog behavior. 

    The knowledge gained in this intermediate level presentation can be applied by dog trainers and other pet professionals in homes, shelters and other contexts. Some of the information that will be shared is also essential learning for dog parents, for those who interact with dogs at any level, and for all those who travel in areas where free-ranging dogs are present.


    Learning Objectives

    • What/Where are free-ranging dogs
    • Bali Dogs: an overview
    • Behaviour-Life Style-Personality: Free-ranging dogs shifts in/via human perception
    • Ecology and canines
    • Professionals and Dog Parents: how to apply what you learn in this webinar in your work and life
    • Rabies: the best practices for people visiting exposed areas


    About your presenter



    Marco Adda is a freelance canids researcher, with a core interest in companion dogs, free-ranging dogs and wolves. Passionate in Animal Behaviour (Ethology), the main focus on Anthrozoology and Human-Animal Interaction/conflict across times and cultures, Marco is a Professional Dog Trainer and Dog Behaviour Consultant, an educator about animals and society, an animal advocate and rescuer. Member of the International Society of Anthrozoology, the Animal Behaviour Society, Accredited Dognition Trainer and founder of Portugal Focus Animal Help, he also runs an online programme about Wolves.

    With complementary interests in education, anthropology, social work, bodywork, theatre, human development, team building and nutrition, Marco has collaborated with universities in Rome, Paris, Novi Sad, Serbia, Budapest, Kuala Lumpur, Melbourne, Hobart and others institutions and organisations around the globe.

    • Monday, May 13, 2019
    • 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM (EDT)
    • Live Webinar
    Register

    Presented by Yvette Van Veen

    CEUs: PPAB 1.5

    Dog training of course is simple, but not always easy.  But there are strategies and techniques that can make what looks like a challenging problem much easier to address.  Avoid the common stumbling blocks to make this a problem you look forward to fixing!

    Objectives:
    • What is leash reactivity?  Define the problem to create a clear training path.

    • Yes you can beat distractions with a cookie!  Here’s how.

    • Why some leash reactive dogs snub food.

    • The importance of creating the right cue.  Teach the dog to do an incompatible behavior when they see what triggers them.

    • What drives the problem?  It’s not fear.

    • Understand the importance of not training in the context until ready.

    • How to build powerful behaviors that stand up to distractions.

    • Avoid bad behavior chains.  It’s not bark then look at me!

    • Clear criteria.  Training is a progression, not a one step skill.


      About The Presenter



      Yvette Van Veen has two decades of experience training dogs, lives and works in London Ontario. She offers both group and private sessions. She has worked extensively with formerly feral dogs. Yvette’s writing has been a long-standing feature in Ontario’s newspapers, currently appearing in the Toronto Star.  Her life is shared with her son Jordan, her formerly feral dog, “Kipper the ex-crotch ripper”, border collie, “Karma” and Icarus the cat. You can reach Yvette at info@awesomedogs.ca or follow her at:  https://www.facebook.com/londondogtrainer/

      • Wednesday, June 05, 2019
      • 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM (EDT)
      • Live Webinar
      Register

      CEUs: PPAB 1.5

      Registered for the live event, get busy and cannot make it?

      Don't worry, you will automatically receive a recording!


      When you see the title to this webinar, I know what some of you will be thinking:  “I don’t ride.  I don’t even work with horses.  Why would I want to attend this webinar?”

      The answer is simple.  Riding is just ground work where you get to sit down.  The same concepts apply.  So even if you work primarily with dogs and other animals that we typically don’t ride, there is much that can be borrowed from clicker training horses that applies to other species.

      And if you do ride, this program is definitely for you!


      Learning Objectives:

      • The connection between ground work and riding
      • Some common questions about riding with the clicker - beginning with how do you deliver the treat?
      • Your expressway to excellence - the value of stopping to get the treat
      • Examining performance goals
      • Safety first
      • Balance matters - why?
      • Before and after - a case study leading to equine beauty and well-being
      • Find a look that pleases your eye
      • A photo journal of a beautiful ride 
      • Which do you focus on - outcome or process?
      • Shaping micro
      • The elephant in the room - pressure and release of pressure
      • Commands versus cues
      • Going micro: your base unit - gives defined
      • Develop your eye - gives observed
      • Developing lightness




      About The Presenter



      Alexandra Kurland is a graduate of Cornell University where she specialized in animal behavior. She began teaching horse training in the early 1980's. Her area of particular interest is the development of a horse's balance: physical and emotional. Helping horses stay sound and happy throughout a long lifetime is the goal. The result are beautiful horses that feel like heaven to ride.

      In 1998 Alexandra launched the rapidly growing field of clicker training for horses with the publication of her  book, "Clicker Training for Your Horse".

      Alexandra's work helps you apply clicker training to any equine need or sport - including developing a gentle and companionable riding horse, halter training foals, training advanced performance horses, and retraining difficult to manage horses. Her own riding interests align most closely with classical dressage.

      Alexandra travels widely, giving clicker training seminars and presenting at conferences in the US, Canada, the UK and Europe. 

      In addition to "Clicker Training for your Horse", she has written "The Click That Teaches: A Step–By–Step Guide in Pictures" and "The Click That Teaches: Riding with the Clicker". She has also produced The Click That Teaches DVD lesson series, and The Clicker Center On-line Training Course.  She maintains a very active blog, theclickercenterblog.com.  She has published a book: "JOYFULL Horses" in her blog and most recently "The Goat Diaries".  Her current project is Equiosity, a weekly podcast which she produces with Dominique Day, one of the co-founders of Cavalia.

      Alexandra Kurland's websites are:
      theclickercenter.com,
      theclickercenterblog.com,
      theclickercentercourse.com and
      equiosity.com
      • Monday, June 17, 2019
      • 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM (EDT)
      • Live Webinar
      Register

      Presented by Yvette Van Veen

      CEUs: PPAB 1.5

      Learn the steps that you can use to teach a dog to go to their bed, not because you say so, but because the dog hears someone at the door. Have the dog stay there until released!  Imagine life with a dog that runs away from the door, not towards it!


      Objectives:

      • Learn the breakdown, all the steps required to get this skill despite distractions at the door.
      • Understand how training this problem “when guests arrive” can be the wrong approach.
      • Learn why some dogs snub cookies when guests arrive and how to overcome it.
      • Why some dogs get worse not better even when families think they are reinforcing good behavior.
      • Learn the value of weakening the power of the sound of the doorbell.
      • Why it’s important to cut yourself some slack and decide it’s necessary to focus fully on the dog during training.  You can put your dog away when you’re distracted!


      About The Presenter



      Yvette Van Veen has two decades of experience training dogs, lives and works in London Ontario. She offers both group and private sessions. She has worked extensively with formerly feral dogs. Yvette’s writing has been a long-standing feature in Ontario’s newspapers, currently appearing in the Toronto Star.  Her life is shared with her son Jordan, her formerly feral dog, “Kipper the ex-crotch ripper”, border collie, “Karma” and Icarus the cat. You can reach Yvette at info@awesomedogs.ca or follow her at:  https://www.facebook.com/londondogtrainer/

      • Wednesday, September 11, 2019
      • 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM (EDT)
      • Live Webinar
      Register

      CEUs: PPAB 1


      Registered for the live event, get busy and cannot make it?

      Don't worry, you will automatically receive a recording!


      Behavioral stereotypies in captive animals have been defined as repetitive, largely invariant patterns of behavior that serve no obvious goal or function (Mason, 1991a; Ödberg, 1978). Stereotypies are commonly attributed to boredom and/or fear and are typically “treated” by trying to enrich the captive environment with distracting, appealing stimuli. These stimuli often include food presented at times outside of regular feeding times, and as a result, engage species-typical foraging behaviors in the process of reducing stereotypic activity.

      This presentation examines the defining features and common hypotheses surrounding stereotypies, including what their function is and how they can be addressed. Of primary concern will be (1) what are stereotypies (what does and doesn’t meet the definition), (2) specific examples of how they’ve been discussed and dealt with, and (3) practical solutions for applied animal behaviorists for both defining and treating stereotypies. Emphasis will be placed on an empirical, functional approach to dealing with stereotypies, including how any scientist and/or practitioner can be most effective when dealing with this topic.

      Learning Objectives

      1. What are stereotypies in terms of their definition and examples?
      2. How do we talk about stereotypies in terms of their form and function?
      3. What evidence supports their hypothesized functions?
      4. How are most stereotypies treated, and which of these treatments are most effective?
      5. What does an empirical, functional approach to stereotypies look like, and why is this important for both science and practice?



      About The Presenter


      Eduardo J Fernandez, PhD

      School of Behavior Analysis, Florida Institute of Technology


      Dr. Eduardo J. Fernandez received his Ph.D. in Psychology (minors in Neuroscience and Animal Behavior) from Indiana University, where he worked with the Indianapolis and Cincinnati Zoo. He received his M.S. in Behavior Analysis from the University of North Texas, where he
      founded and was President of the Organization for Reinforcement Contingencies with Animals (ORCA). Most of his past and current work involves conducting research on the behavioral welfare of captive exotic animals found in zoos and aquariums. He has worked with close to 50 species of animals, with a focus on marine animals, carnivores, and primates. He is currently a Visiting Professor in the School of Behavior Analysis at Florida Institute of Technology. His past positions include an Affiliate Professorship in the Psychology Department at University of Washington, Research Fellowship with Woodland Park Zoo, and National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship. While working with UW and Woodland Park Zoo, he started the Behavioral Enrichment Animal Research (BEAR) group, which conducted welfare research with the African and Asian elephants, hippos, Humboldt penguins, grizzly bears, sun bears, sloth bears, Sumatran tigers, jaguars, African wild dogs, meerkats, golden lion tamarins, and ostriches located at the zoo. Eduardo also continues to run the Animal Reinforcement Forum (ARF), a former listserv and now Facebook group
      , which is dedicated to group discussions on animal training and behavior from a scientific perspective.


         
         
     
    Connect With Us:
    All content copyright 2017. The Pet Professional Guild . All rights reserved. The PPG is a 501 c 6 Non Profit organization
    Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software • Web Design & Development by DotCreativity Web Design Services