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Pet Care Webinars

Recorded Pet Care Webinars

    • Wednesday, October 28, 2015
    • 8:00 PM
    • Friday, October 28, 2022
    • 9:00 PM
    • Recorded Webinar
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    presented by Dr. Jessica Hekman

    CEUs: PPAB 1, IAABC 1, CPDT 1, KPA 1 



    We've known for years how important it is to socialize puppies (and, in fact, animals of all mammalian species) at a young age in order to prevent behavior problems such as fearfulness and aggression from cropping up later. In this webinar, we will learn about how the canine socialization period was discovered, and we'll review the current state of knowledge about its timing. In the meat of the talk, we'll discuss some recent research findings about exactly what is going on in the brain which is different in puppies in their socialization window compared to older dogs outside the socialization window. We'll talk about differences in the puppy stress response and where those differences originate; we'll also talk about studies that have used a critical period of eye development to learn about neural wiring differences in the socialization period, and what implications those have for puppies. Finally, we will discuss appropriate ways of balancing a puppy's need for socialization with the dangers of exposing a puppy to other dogs before its immune system is mature.


    Webinar Objectives

    • Describe the timing of the canine socialization window and the methods used to discover it
    • Describe two mechanisms which are known to function differently in the mammalian brain during the socialization period
    • Suggest approaches to satisfying a puppy's need for socialization with the dangers of exposing a puppy to other dogs prior to the end of its puppy vaccine series


    About The Presenter


    Jessica Perry Hekman, DVM, MS is fascinated by dog brains. She is a PhD student at the University of Illinois, training in a genomics lab which studies a population of tame foxes. Her interests include the stress response in mammals, canine behavior, shelter medicine, and animal welfare. You may learn more about Jessica at www.dogzombie.com.
    • Thursday, January 28, 2016
    • 12:00 PM
    • Saturday, January 28, 2023
    • 1:30 PM
    • Recorded Webinar
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    Presented by Lisa Gunter

    CEUs: PPAB 1.5, IAABC 1.5, CPDT 1.5, KPA 1.5


    In this presentation, Lisa will discuss the findings of recent studies from the Canine Science Collaboratory in which they investigated the influence of breed labels on people’s perceptions of pit-bull-type dogs, their length of stay at the shelter and adoption success. She will also report the results of nearly a thousand breed ancestry tests carried out on dogs living in shelters.

    The Canine Science Collaboratory is finding that these canines have far more varied and complex breed identities than previously imagined - adding more fuel to the fire that breed identification of mixed breed dogs is a complex endeavor at best and untenable at worst.  

    Webinar Objectives

    • Evaluate influence of previously held perceptions about breeds of dogs
    • Assess effect of breed labeling on perceived attractiveness of shelter dogs
    • Understand how breed labeling in shelters could impact dog adoptions and length of stay
    • Recognize diversity of breed mixes within shelter dog population and implications regarding breed-specific behavior

    About The Presenter


    Lisa Gunter, MA is a PhD student at Arizona State University in the Department of Psychology's Behavioral Neuroscience area and conducts her research under the mentorship of Clive Wynne in the Canine Science Collaboratory.   

    Lisa recently earned her MA in Behavioral Neuroscience, holds a BA in Journalism from The Evergreen State College and has worked with dogs in animal shelters and with their owners for nearly a decade. Lisa's research investigates how breed labels influence perceptions of dogs at shelters and interventions focused on helping adopters with new dogs. She has presented her research at numerous conferences including the Association of Professional Dog Trainers, Interdisciplinary Forum for Applied Animal Behavior, Veterinary Behavior Symposium and the International Society of Anthrozoology.

    • Wednesday, March 23, 2016
    • 8:00 PM
    • Thursday, March 23, 2023
    • 9:00 PM
    • Recorded Webinar
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    CEUs: PPAB 1, IAABC 1, CPDT 1, KPA 1


    Why do puppies need to have such a long series of vaccines? Owners have difficulty understanding the ins and outs of the puppy (and kitten) vaccine series, and may ask you to explain exactly WHY they can't consider their new pet fully immunized after the first set of shots. Does this have to do with the number of shots or with the timing of the shots? What is so special about 16-18 weeks of age that animals can now start going out in public more?

    In this webinar, Dr. Jessica Hekman will explain the biology behind the developing immune system and the reason for the complex timing of puppy vaccines. Beginning with the basics of how the mammalian immune system works and how vaccines provide protection from infectious disease, she will explain how the immature immune system differs biologically from the adult immune system. She will describe the reasoning behind giving puppies a series of shots, so that you can better explain the process to owners. She will conclude with a few practical suggestions for balancing the need to socialize young animals with the need to protect them from infectious disease.


    Learning Objectives

    • summarize how vaccines provide protection from infectious disease
    • explain how the immature (puppy/kitten) immune system differs biologically from the adult immune system
    • explain why puppy shots are not effective long term when given before 16-18 weeks of age
    • explain why we give puppies repeated vaccinations between the ages of 6-18 weeks even though we do not expect these vaccinations to be effective long term
    • describe a practical approach to balancing the conflicting needs of socialization and reduced exposure to infectious disease during ages 6-18 weeks


    About The Presenter

    Dr. Jessica Hekman

    Jessica is a veterinarian currently pursuing a PhD in genetics. After eleven years working as a computer programmer, she decided to go back to school to research the causes of behavior problems in dogs. She received her veterinary degree from the Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine in Massachusetts, where she also received a Master's degree for her work on stress behaviors in hospitalized dogs. After graduation, she completed a year-long internship specializing in shelter medicine at the University of Florida Maddie's Shelter Medicine Program. She is now enrolled in a PhD program in genetics at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Her lab studies a group of foxes (often known as the "Siberian silver foxes") which have been bred over many generations to be friendly to humans. Her ultimate goal is to find genetic causes of fearfulness in dogs, to work with behaviorally challenged shelter dogs, and to help people better understand the science behind dog behavior.

    • Monday, July 18, 2016
    • 12:00 PM
    • Monday, July 18, 2022
    • 1:00 PM
    • Recorded Webinar
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    presented by Dr. Franklin McMillan

    CEUs: PPAB 1.25, CCPDT 1.25, IAABC 1.25



    Join Dr. Franklin McMillan for this presentation about the most current knowledge covering psychological trauma in dogs, including types, causes, and treatments. The concept of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) will be presented as it relates to dogs. The role of fear in psychological trauma will be clarified.

    Webinar Objectives

    • To understand the types of psychological trauma in dogs
    • To review the most important causes of psychological trauma in dogs
    • To learn the key results of our studies on dogs rescued from abuse, puppy mills, and hoarding situations
    • To acquire the most current information on canine PTSD in military dogs
    • To review the current approaches to treating psychological trauma in dogs

    About The Presenter


    Frank McMillan, DVM is a board-certified specialist in animal welfare and veterinary internal medicine and currently the director of well-being studies at Best Friends Animal Society. Before coming to Best Friends in 2007, Dr. Frank was in private practice in Los Angeles for 23 years and was a clinical professor of medicine at the Western University of Health Sciences College of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Frank’s research concerns animal quality of life and the mental health and emotional well-being of animals who have endured hardship, adversity, and psychological trauma. Dr. Frank lectures worldwide and has published dozens of scientific journal articles and is the author of the textbook Mental Health and Well-Being in Animals, and a book for the general public titled Unlocking the Animal Mind.

    • Thursday, September 01, 2016
    • 10:00 AM
    • Thursday, September 01, 2022
    • 11:00 AM
    • Recorded Webinar
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    Does Canine Hypothyroidism Really Affect Behavior?

    Presented by Lisa Radosta DVM

    CEUs. PPAB 1, IAABC 1, CPDT 1, KPA 1



    Canine hypothyroidism has long been targeted as a cause of behavior disorders. This lecture will examines the research associated with canine hypothyroidism as it relates to emotional disorders in dogs with a goal of expanding knowledge and critical assessment of claims.

    Webinar Objectives

    • Understand how thyroid hormones affect the specific body systems.
    • Understand current research in canine hypothyroidism.
    • Understand how to critically examine the research.


    About The Presenter



    Dr. Radosta is the owner of Florida Veterinary Behavior Service in Jupiter Florida. She completed a residency in behavioral medicine at University of Pennsylvania where she received two national research awards. She has authored textbook chapters; writes a column for the Palm Beach Post and podcasts CE for VetGirl. She has published research papers on thyroid disease and clinician client communication and has lectured across the country and internationally. She is the behavior section editor for Small Animal Advances in Medicine and Surgery, sits on the American Animal Hospital Association Behavior Management Guidelines Task Force and the Fear Free Advisory Board.

    • Friday, April 07, 2017
    • 2:00 PM
    • Friday, April 07, 2023
    • 3:15 PM
    • Recorded Webinar
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    Presented by Dr. Nancy Kay

    CEUs: PPAB 1.25, CCPDT 1.5, IAABC 1.25


    Over the past decade, a series of canine spay/neuter research projects have provided compelling data that challenges our long-held beliefs about the impacts of neutering dogs. Some of the studies document an increased incidence of orthopedic diseases and/or cancer in dogs neutered before one year of age. Others document increased behavioral issues associated with neutering.

    This presentation will focus on the results of the recent research and how our thoughts about neutering dogma are beginning to shift. There's little doubt that neutering recommendations for our pet dogs are beginning to change. Webinar participants will land on the cutting edge of awareness of these changes.


    Learning Objectives
    • Review long-standing spay/neuter dogma
    • Review the research (or lack thereof) that contributes to current spay/neuter dogma
    • Learn about results of recent canine spay/neuter research
    • Have the opportunity to challenge long-standing spay/neuter dogma

    About The Presenter



    Dr. Nancy Kay received her veterinary degree from Cornell College of Veterinary Medicine, and she completed her residency training in small animal internal medicine at the University of California—Davis Veterinary School. Dr. Kay is a board certified specialist in the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine. Recently retired from clinical practice, she worked as a specialist in private practice for 32 years. She is published in several professional journals and textbooks and lectures professionally to regional and national audiences. One of her favorite lecture topics is communication between veterinarians and their clients. Since the release of her books, Speaking for Spot: Be the Advocate Your Dog Needs to Live a Happy, Healthy, Longer Life and Your Dog’s Best Health, Dr. Kay has lectured extensively and written numerous magazine articles on the topic of medical advocacy. She was a featured guest on the popular National Public Radio show, Fresh Air with Terry Gross. Dr. Kay’s award winning blog, “Spot Speaks” is posted weekly.

    Dr. Kay was selected by the American Animal Hospital Association to receive the Hill’s Animal Welfare and Humane Ethics Award. This award is given annually to a veterinarian or nonveterinarian who has advanced animal welfare through extraordinary service or by furthering humane principles, education, and understanding. Dr. Kay was the Leo K. Bustad Companion Animal Veterinarian of the Year, an award presented every year by the American Veterinary Medical Association to a veterinarian whose work exemplifies and promotes the human animal bond. Dr. Kay has received several awards from the Dog Writer’s Association of America. Dr. Kay’s personal life revolves around her husband (also a veterinarian), her three children (none of whom aspire to be veterinarians) and their menagerie of four-legged family members. When she’s not speaking or writing, she spends her spare moments in the garden or horseback riding. Dr. Kay resides in Hendersonville, North Carolina.

    • Wednesday, July 19, 2017
    • 2:00 PM
    • Wednesday, July 19, 2023
    • 3:00 PM
    • Recorded Webinar
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    Presented by Dr. Amy Pike

    CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT 1, IAABC 1


    With the Fear Free movement taking rapid hold on our profession, we will take an in-depth look at the concepts of fear, anxiety and stress in our patients and how that effects the practice of veterinary medicine.

    This webinar will also cover products, medication and training that can help accomplish the most positive, fear free veterinary visit possible for our fearful and aggressive patients.


    About The Presenter


    Dr. Pike graduated from Colorado State University School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences in 2003. After graduation, she was commissioned as a Captain into the United States Army Veterinary Corps. It was dealing with the Military Working Dogs returning from deployment that spurred her initial interest in behavior medicine. After getting off of active duty in 2006, Dr. Pike worked exclusively in small animal practice where she furthered her love of behavior medicine by seeing cases and teaching puppy and kitten socialization. In 2011, the Pike family was stationed in the St. Louis area at Scott Air Force Base where Dr. Pike started seeing behavior referrals in a Residency program officially approved by the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists (ACVB) under the mentorship of Dr. Debra Horwitz, DACVB. In October 2015, Dr. Pike passed the ACVB certifying examination.

    Dr. Pike is chief of the Behavior Medicine Division at the Veterinary Referral Center of Northern Virginia in Manassas (a suburb of Washington DC) where she sees referral behavior cases. Dr. Pike is a clinical instructor for the on-line education system "E-training for Dogs" and a member of the Fear Free Advisory Committee, advising general practitioners on the art of practicing “Fear Free”. She was recently named one of the “Top Veterinarians of Northern Virginia” by NoVa Magazine. In her spare time, she enjoys hanging out with her family, including her Active Duty Army husband, their two kids, ages 4 and 9, and their Scottie, Mini Schnauzer, Devon Rex, and Ring Neck Parrot.

    • Monday, August 21, 2017
    • 1:00 PM
    • Monday, August 21, 2023
    • 2:30 PM
    • Recorded Webinar
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    Presented by Pat Miller

    CEUs: PPAB 1.5, CCPDT 1.5, IAABC 1.5


    Much of what we call canine aggression is widely misunderstood and demonized behavior in the dog world. In fact, much of canine aggression is natural, normal socially adaptive behavior that is intended to *avoid* conflict rather than cause it. It is often the inappropriate human response that causes the dog's behavior to escalate to dangerous levels.

    This webinar discusses aggression, what is normal versus pathological, and how dog training and behavior professionals can help their clients understand and live with their dogs peacefully. We will explore management and modification protocols for aggression, how to know if you are qualified and ready to work with aggression cases, and when it is appropriate to recommend euthanasia for a client's dog. (Spoiler alert... I have *never*)

    Objectives

    • Gain a better understanding of canine aggression
    • Dispel myths about aggression
    • Discuss protocols for modifying aggressive behavior
    • Explore whether professionals are qualified to handle aggression cases


    About The Presenter


    Pat Miller is a Certified Behavior Consultant, Canine (KA), Certified Professional Dog Trainer (KA), past president of the Association of Professional Dog Trainers (US) and past board member of the Certification Council for Professional Dog Trainers. Miller worked at the Marin Humane Society in Novato, California from 1976 to 1996, first as a volunteer, then in customer service, as a humane officer, Customer Service Supervisor, Field Supervisor, and for the final ten years as Director of Operations. During this time, she obtained an Associate Degree in Administration of Justice and a BS in Business Administration. In 1996 Miller left the Humane Society to launch Peaceable Paws in Monterey, California.

    Miller now offers group good manners classes, private training and behavior modification services, dog training workshops and trainer academies at her Peaceable Paws 80-acre training facility in Fairplay, Maryland, where she and her husband Paul live with their three dogs, eight cats, four horses, five chickens, and a pot-bellied pig. In addition, Miller presents seminars and workshops around the world on a variety of training and behavior topics. She has authored seven books on dog behavior and training: “The Power of Positive Dog Training,” “Positive Perspectives,” “Positive Perspectives 2,” “Play With Your Dog,” “Do-Over Dogs,” “How to Foster Dogs” and “Beware of the Dog.” Miller is training editor for The Whole Dog Journal, and also writes for several other publications, www.peaceablepaws.com. In May of 2015, Pat was named by Dog Fancy Magazine as one of 45 people who have changed the dog world.

    • Tuesday, August 29, 2017
    • 2:00 PM
    • Tuesday, August 29, 2023
    • 3:00 PM
    • Recorded Webinar
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    Presented by Sharon Wachsler

    CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT 1, IAABC 1


    Have you been asked to train a service dog (SD), emotional support animal (ESA), or a personal "therapy dog" for an adult or child with disabilities? What do all these terms mean, and what are your responsibilities as a trainer? Did you know that the laws for service-dogs-in-training (SDiTs) are different from laws for trained service dogs and vary from state-to-state?

    Pet dog trainers are increasingly approached by clients who want help with training a service dog or emotional support animal (or what they may refer to as a "therapy dog") for themselves or a family member. It can be very confusing for trainer and client alike to sort out these terms and the legal and training requirements behind each. This presentation will explain the legal meanings and differences between these terms in the United States, the requirements for training each, differences in US state laws for service-dogs-in-training, the standards of behavior and appearance for service dogs, and explain the reality behind the question of "certification." You'll also learn how to distinguish between legal requirements and ethical or community standards, and how to apply these concepts to working with clients.

    Objectives

    This presentation is geared to professional dog trainers in the United States that are new to the complicated world of service dog laws and standards. No previous service dog training experience or knowledge is necessary.

    By the end of this webinar, attendees will understand and be able to answer client questions on the following topics:

    • The difference between the terms "service dog," "service dog in training," "emotional support animal," and "therapy dog" and when handlers of each have access to public accommodations
    • Understand the definition of a service animal under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and where a trainer or handler of a service animal is permitted or excluded
    • Understand how laws for service-dogs-in-training (and who is a trainer under the law) vary from state-to-state and how to find out their own state's laws
    • Understand the community standards for appearance and behavior in service dogs and how these differ from legal requirements
    • Steps trainers and clients can take to protect themselves if access challenges occur

    About The Presenter


    Sharon Wachsler CPDT-KA, KPA-CTP is a Certified Professional Dog Trainer and Karen Pryor Academy Certified Training Partner with more than 25 years of experience in the disability community. Before she began her second career as a dog trainer, Sharon was a disability information and referral specialist and service dog owner-trainer, as well as the founder of the Assistance Dog Blog Carnival, a writer for the International Association of Assistance Dog Partners newsletter, and the blogger for the popular service-dog trainer's blog, After Gadget. Sharon opened At Your Service Dog Training in Wendell, MA, in 2014, offering private training, consulting, and group classes to service dog owner-trainers. Sharon is an experienced presenter and writer on service dog topics and enjoys consulting with and speaking to trainers, owners, and community groups about service dogs and their training.

    • Saturday, December 09, 2017
    • 1:00 PM
    • Saturday, December 09, 2023
    • 2:00 PM
    • Recorded Webinar
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    Presented by Dr. Holly Ganz

    CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT 1, IAABC 1

    Webinar Description

    We will start with some background information about the microbiome and its role in animal health, including digestion, immunity, and the nervous system. Then we will consider how contemporary lifestyles, such as antibiotic usage and modern diets, may affect the composition of microbes living in the digestive tract.

    We will consider how various health conditions, such as Irritable Bowel Disease is associated with alterations in the gut microbiome and the implications of these observations. Finally we will review different approaches that can be taken to improve gut health.

    Webinar Learning Objectives

    • The microbiome and its role in animal health
    • Roles played by key bacteria in the gut
    • Different approaches to maintaining and restoring gut health, probiotics, diet, and fecal transplants

    Your Presenter


    Holly H. Ganz, PhD, CEO and founder of AnimalBiome, is a microbiologist, who has published more than 20 papers. She left academia to become an entrepreneur when she founded AnimalBiome in the fall of 2016. AnimalBiome provides assessments of the bacterial composition of the digestive tract of dogs and cats and is creating therapies to help promote healthy guts. Her efforts to translate academic research into solutions for animal lovers began when she launched KittyBiome, a citizen science project that she started while working at the University of California (UC), Davis in 2015. From the KittyBiome project, she came to appreciate that digestive disorders are common in pets and that there is a pressing need for better diagnostics and therapeutics.

    Holly received her PhD from UC Davis, where she studied co-evolution between microbes and animals. After receiving her doctorate, she was awarded a postdoctoral fellowship from the National Science Foundation to study how genetics affects the spread of fungal infections in animal populations. Subsequently she was a postdoctoral fellow at UC Berkeley studying how bacterial pathogens survive in soil to infect wildlife. She also holds a MS from UC San Diego, where she studied population genetics, and a BS from George Washington University, where she was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, received Special Honors in the Biological Sciences, and graduated magna cum laude. An animal lover, Holly is dedicated to improving animal health and wellness through the application of the latest innovations in microbiology.

    • The microbiome and its role in animal health
    • Roles played by key bacteria in the gut
    • Different approaches to maintaining and restoring gut health, probiotics, diet, and fecal transplants
    • Monday, January 29, 2018
    • 7:00 PM
    • Sunday, January 29, 2023
    • 8:00 PM
    • Recorded Webinar
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    Free Member Webinar

    Presented by Sheila Blanchette

    CEUs: PPAB 1, IAABC 1, CCPDT 1

    This webinar focuses on the topic of reducing the stress when giving medication to a companion bird. The webinar will show known processes of giving medication, the consequences of stress, and how to takes steps than can reduce or eliminate stress during the medication process. Gain some insightful knowledge about how a force-free medication process can be better improve your bond with you and your bird.

    This webinar also touches on starting crate training for preparing for vet visits which can reduces stress in the vet visit, and why this is so important.

    Webinar Learning Objectives

    Quick Review on Companion Bird health/Vet Visit

    How to recognize stress in a companion bird.

    How to start force-free planning on the taking medication

    How to advance progress in the medication training

    How to start force-free crate training for your companion bird

    Gain knowledge on how your bird can be a super star at the vet visit


    About the Presenter


    Sheila Blanchette

    Sheila S Blanchette is an IAABC Certified Parrot Behavior Consultant. She is the owner of the mobile behavior consultant company, Heart of Feathers Education in the MA/NH Area (USA). Sheila’s main goal is to assist people with companion birds with behavior issues vs surrendering the bird. She is also a member of IAABC Shelter Division, Pet Professional Guild and American Federation of Aviculture.

    Sheila has been volunteering at the MSPCA-Nevins Farm (Methuen, MA), for many years assisting potential adopters on topics such as enrichment, education and understanding more about having a companion bird. In 2017, she will be teaching Target Training Bird classes at the rescue for anyone with a companion bird. She believes "Behavior may have history but history should not define a bird." Sheila is the proud guardian of 2 lorikeets, an adopted lovebird, and a cockatiel and a pug.

    • Thursday, May 10, 2018
    • 2:00 PM
    • Wednesday, May 10, 2023
    • 3:00 PM
    • Recorded Webinar
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    Free Member Webinar

    Presented by Lori Nanan

    CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT 1, IAABC 1


    By building a positive conditioned response to a particular implement and following a good desensitization plan, trainers can help even dogs who are fearful about nail care. Even better, trainers can coach owners through the process effectively, giving them the opportunity to create a lifetime of cooperative care.

    We'll cover why DS is often necessary and how to walk through the process effectively, by being mindful of body language and working at the dog's pace.

    We'll also cover nail and paw anatomy, so that even those most shy about nail care can become comfortable with it!

    Objectives

    - Gain an understanding of why nail care can be so difficult for some dogs

    - Learn why the +CER building process is so important to the process

    - Walk through a desensitization process, and be able to teach clients how to do the same

    - Gain an understanding of paw and nail anatomy and why nail maintenance is so important to dogs' health


    About Your Presenter

    Lori Nanan CTC, CPDT-KA is the co-founder of LoriNanan.com, a company which provides education and digital solutions to dog owners, force-free dog pros and organizations. She is a graduate of The Academy for Dog Trainers, where she is also a staff member and is the founder of Your Pit Bull and You, a nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting pit bulls in a positive light.
    • Wednesday, July 11, 2018
    • 1:00 PM
    • Monday, July 11, 2022
    • 2:30 PM
    • GoToWebinar
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    Presented by Alexandra Santos

    CEUs: PPAB 1.5, IAABC 1.5

    This presentation is about separation distress in dogs.If, on one hand, separation distress has an evolutionary function, on the other hand it becomes a serious problem when a pet dog is afflicted. Separation anxiety has repercussions on the dog's and owner's quality of life. It can be resillient to behavior modification mainly due to the fact that the protocol itself can't always be carried out under controlled situations.

    we will discuss the characteristics of separation distress,its various causes (biological, behavioral and environmental), its symptoms (physical and behavioral), how to distinguish it from virtual separation distress and social isolation phobia. The presentation briefly mentions treatment options and emphasizes the importance of referral to a veterinary behaviorist. Then it will focus on a behavior modification protocol that entails: environmental enrichment (different kinds of exercise, rest, training,toys, olfactory stimulation);what to do when the dog is left alone; environmental changes that will make him more comfortable; relaxation protocol;owner behavior adaptations;preparing the dog for being left alone.

    Objective

    Attendees will learn the causes of separation distress in dogs - biological, environmental and behavioral.They will also learn the differences between separation distress, virtual separation distress, and social isolation phobia. I will share with them the importance of environmental enrichment and what it is, and the importance of olfactory stimulation.Finally, they will learn the protocol I use for solving separation distress, issues that hinder the dog's progress, and how food dispensing toys given only prior to the owner's departure may actually represent an instance of backward counter conditioning.

    Your Presenter

                  

    Alexandra Santos

    Alexandra Santos is a professional canine behavior consultant and trainer, with formal education through The Animal Care College in the U.K. where she graduated with honors for the Diploma of Advanced Canine Psychology, and through The Companion Animal Sciences Institute where she graduated with distinction for the Diploma of Advanced Dog Training.

    She is the author of the books “Puppy Problems” and “Puppy and Dog Care” and has also authored and co-authored several articles for the Journal of Applied Companion Animal Behavior and for the International Institute for Applied Companion Animal Behavior. Alexandra lives and works in Lisbon, Portugal, has been a lecturer at several seminars on positive reinforcement-based training, regularly presents webinars for the Pet Professional Guild, is a professor at Universidade Lusófona de Humanidades e Tecnologias and provides individual coaching for dogs and their people..

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